Ford Ranger Offers Standard AEB With Pedestrian Detection

Ford is now offering the Ranger and Ranger Raptor with standard Autonomous Emergency Braking (AEB) and pedestrian detection as standard across the range. After introducing AEB as standard on the Ranger Wildtrak in late 2018, the technology has been added range-wide as part of a feature update for Ranger models.

“Ranger has a tradition of leading technology, which includes being the first pick-up to achieve a five-star ANCAP safety rating, and in 2018 we added more powertrain choices and significant Driver Assist Technology coupled with a five-year, unlimited kilometre warranty,” said Ford Australia and New Zealand President and CEO, Kay Hart. “Now, AEB with Pedestrian Detection, Lane Keeping Aid, Traffic Sign Recognition and Automatic High Beam is standard on every Ranger, from the entry-level Ranger XL cab-chassis all the way through to the Ford Performance Ranger Raptor.”

The new technology suite comes with a host of updates for Ranger and Ranger Raptor, which sees a high level of equipment that spans the complete lineup, including cab- chassis models, building on the Ranger’s five-star ANCAP rating.

“The standard inclusion of AEB on the Ford Ranger and Ranger Raptor is great news for ute buyers and other road users,” said ANCAP Chief Executive, James Goodwin. “As one of Australia’s top sellers, having this important safety technology fitted across the Ranger lineup will have a big impact.”

Building on the changes introduced to Ranger in late 2018, which included a twin-turbo, 10-speed powertrain option and new features such as “Semi-Auto Active Park Assist”, HID headlamps, keyless entry and “Tailgate with Lift Assistance”, Ford says the Ranger lineup has never offered such a comprehensive array of technology, driver assist and convenience features.

Make ‘America First’ In Pedestrian Protection, Global NCAP Tells Donald Trump

In response to President Donald Trump’s claim last week that a so called ‘bowling ball’ test is preventing US automobiles from entering the Japanese market, Global NCAP has written to the US President urging him to make ‘America First’ in pedestrian protection by adopting the same global standard applied by Japan. In its letter, Global NCAP explain the purpose of the United Nation’s Global Technical Regulation on pedestrian protection (GTR No 9) which aims to mitigate the risk of head injury by encouraging deformation of the hood.

Applied in Japan and in the European Union (EU) since 2005, a similar test was proposed by the National Highway Safety Administration in December 2015 to be included in the US New Car Assessment Program. At the time NHTSA noted that pedestrian protection measures in Europe and Japan “have likely contributed to a downward trend in pedestrian fatalities” and argued that “including pedestrian protection in the NCAP program would be a step toward realizing similar downward trends experienced in regions of the world that include pedestrians in their consumer information programs”. To date this proposed update of the US NCAP has not happened.

Global NCAP also points out that pedestrian fatalities in the USA have risen for two years in succession now amounting to 6000 lives lost per annum and accounting for 16 per cent of total road deaths. The organisation, therefore, “strongly agrees with NHTSA’s 2015 assessment that improved pedestrian protection in the USA could help reduce the number killed in such crashes each year”.