Motoring News

Audi Australia Initiates Takata Recall

Audi Australia has begun recalling vehicles with frontal Takata airbag inflators. The mandatory safety recall, which was issued by the Australian government earlier this year, requires that all affected Takata frontal airbags in Australia be replaced by 31 December 2020.

“Our customers are our first priority and, as a result of the Australian government’s mandatory recall of certain vehicles with frontal Takata airbag inflators, we will be conducting a staged recall of the affected vehicles between now and the end of 2020. We will contact owners to let them know when they should visit a dealer to have their Takata airbag inflator replaced, free of charge,” said Audi spokesperson Shaun Cleary.

The first group of Audi vehicles under active recall includes Audi Q5 (8R), model years 2009-2012, installed with driver side Takata airbag inflators. By the end of July 2018, the following additional models will be under active recall:

  • Audi A5 Sportback (8T), model years 2009-2012, installed with driver side Takata airbag inflators;
  • Audi A5 Cabriolet (8F), model years 2010-2011, installed with driver side Takata airbag inflators;
  • Audi A3 (8P), model years 2006-2013, installed with driver side Takata airbag inflators.

The company expects to have initiated a recall of all Audi vehicles with affected Takata airbags by the end of 2018. Owners of these vehicles will be contacted directly on an individual basis.

Audi has prepared a VIN check tool on its website (see address below) to determine whether a vehicle is affected by the mandatory safety recall and, if so, the specific date from which it will be recalled. The website also contains Audi’s approved Recall Initiation Schedule, which outlines more generally when each make, model and model year of affected Audi vehicles is scheduled to be recalled.

Audi says none of its vehicles imported into Australia are equipped with ‘alpha’ airbags, which have been identified as posing the highest safety risk of all the recalled Takata airbags and must be recalled by manufacturers of vehicles containing those airbags immediately.

According to Audi, the Australian government says that as the faulty ‘non-alpha’ Takata airbags fitted to the recalled vehicles ages and/or is exposed to high temperatures and humidity, the PSAN propellant is exposed to moisture and degrades. If a vehicle is involved in a collision, the airbag can go off with too much explosive force, rupturing the airbag inflator housing. This causes sharp metal fragments to shoot out, resulting in death or serious injury to vehicle occupants.

Audi says the Australian government warns a defective Takata airbag may rupture between six and 25 years after it is installed in a vehicle. In areas of high heat and humidity, the risk of rupture may arise between six and nine years.

For more information, visit Audi’s Takata recall webpage at www.audi.com.au/au/web/en/owners/Takata-Airbag-Safety-Recall.html, or contact Audi’s toll-free Audi Takata Information Line on 1800 856 770 during business hours.